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LETTING GO AND MOVING ON BY JAMES OH

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MINDSET SHIFT: EMPLOYEE TO ENTREPRENEUR

MINDSET SHIFT: EMPLOYEE TO ENTREPRENEUR
BY JAMES OH

Thursday, July 7, 2011

THE BOY CRIED "WOLF" PART II

Very happy day to everyone,

It was a great pleasure for me to share this classic story, The boy called "Wolf" which most of us had known since childhood, some may even 78uinkl./at early childhood. However, it is sad to know that many people do not know its adverse implications. Alternatively you may argue that we choose to ignore its lessons.
The tale concerns a shepherd boy who tricks nearby villagers into thinking a wolf is attacking his flock. He repeats this so many times that when the sheep were actually confronted by a wolf, the villagers do not believe his cries for help and the flock is destroyed. The morale at the end of the Greek version is that 'the story shows that this is how liars are rewarded: even if they tell the truth, no one believes them.'[2] This seems to echo a statement attributed to Aristotle by Diogenes Laërtius in his The lives and opinions of eminent philosophers, where the sage was asked what those who tell lies gained  and he answered 'that when they speak the truth they are not believed'[3] William Caxton similarly closes his version with the remark that men bileve not lyghtly hym whiche is knowen for a lyer.[4]
The story dates from Classical times but, since it was recorded only in Greek and not translated into Latin until the 15th century, it only began to gain currency after it appeared in Heinrich Steinhowel's collection of the fables and so spread through the rest of Europe. For this reason, there was no agreed title for the story. Caxton titles it "Of the child whiche kepte the sheep" (1484), Hieronymus Osius "The boy who lied" (De mendace puero, 1574), Francis Barlow "Of the herd boy and the farmers" (De pastoris puero et agricolis, 1687), Roger L'Estrange "A boy and false alarms" (1692), George Fyler Townsend "The shepherd boy and the wolf" (1867). It was under the final title that Edward Hughes set it as the first of ten "Songs from Aesop's fables" for children’s voices and piano, in a poetic version by Peter Westmore (1965).
There are many lessons that can be learnt from it.
First, the phrase "I know it" is a very dangerous sentence to be used. Why I say so? Anyone wants to make a guess before you read further? This may be either due to the liars' ignorance or recklessness. 

Alternatively, you can see so many incidents that affirm this truth. One of them is in regard to the great scientist that discovered the Gravity theory. He truly did not understand why the apples dropped from the trees, whereas the rest at that time appeared to know why the apples dropped from the trees. That's because this boy did not prescribed to the above phrase that led him to seek for the answer. His profound theory of gravity is still applicable and relevant till todate.
 
Coming  back to the above tale, the boy cried wolf, it will be interesting to find the answer what if the boy cried "no wolf" instead of 'Wolf' when wolfs appeared. You may furnish your answer on whether you will go and rescue the boy, through the comment provided below. Thanks for your honest feedbacks and participation.
 
Thanks and seeing you again,

James Oh

Skype me at james.oh18
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