Google+ Followers

Followers

Growing Your Wealth Exponentially

Growing Your Wealth Exponentially
BY JAMES OH

Search This Blog

Loading...

LETTING GO AND MOVING ON BY JAMES OH

LETTING GO AND MOVING ON BY JAMES OH
TO BUY PLEASE CLICK AT THE IMAGE

Translate

MINDSET SHIFT: EMPLOYEE TO ENTREPRENEUR

MINDSET SHIFT: EMPLOYEE TO ENTREPRENEUR
BY JAMES OH

Sunday, November 1, 2009

Stay stress-free life

Dear loving readers and visitors,

In this article I am so excited to share with you some way to de-stress yourself.

Secrets to Stress-Free Life

Our lives are like that. We sometimes get so busy that we don't take time to sharpen the axe. In today's world, it seems that everyone is busier than ever, but less happy than ever. Why is that? Could it be that we have forgotten how to stay sharp? There's nothing wrong with activity and hard work. But we should not get so busy and neglect the truly important things in life, like our personal life, taking time to care for others, Taking time to read etc. We all need time to relax, to think and meditate, to learn and grow. If you don't take the time to sharpen the axe, we will become dull and lose our effectiveness. So, start from today, think about the ways by which you could do your job more effectively and add a lot of
value to it.

Hope this story has given you some insight to life, may you be happy always!


"TO HANDLE YOURSELF, USE YOUR HEAD. TO HANDLE OTHERS, USE YOUR HEART"


Label this with a few descriptive words -- also called tags -- to organize your collection.

Separate each tag with a comma. If this is a brownie recipe, you might type: chocolate, dessert, Sue's party

Add a note below. This note can be seen only by you.

Leave yourself a reminder, a tweak, an idea, or anything else related to this item.


What do you think of this? Let everyone know!


Connect with Facebook to easily update your status and share photos, recipes, and more with your friends.
ConnectClosecancel

More Ways to Share:

* Delicious
* Twitter
* Yahoo! Buzz
* Google
* Stumble!

Secrets to Stress-Free Life

When Kathleen Hall stepped off the elevator at her office on the 104th floor one Monday, she had it all: beauty, smarts, a successful career as a stockbroker on Wall Street, a supportive husband, and two healthy children. But despite her efforts to act composed, she was terrified. Nauseated and short of breath, her chest tight, she stopped to lean against a wall. She didn't move from that spot until a security guard took notice and asked if she was okay. She wasn't. Her life, until then so calculated, had come to a screeching halt.

Born to a violent, alcoholic father and a victimized mother, Hall, 55, had learned early what it took to survive. She worked hard as a teenager, baby-sitting, cutting hair in her garage, even detailing cars to scrape cash together. When married and pregnant with her first child, she began to put herself through college. Later she strove to achieve corporate success and make money -- something she knew brought power. But the years of late hours and high-stakes pressure (not to mention the weekly commute from her home base in Georgia) seemed to coalesce into a single realization: Winning the race wouldn't bring happiness. In fact, it could cost her life itself. She turned around, got back in the elevator, and booked a flight home.

Twenty years later, Hall is one of the nation's noted experts on stress management, sought after by clients, colleagues, and media in times of crisis. "I've seen stress cause people to totally shut down -- physically and emotionally. They lose focus and become disoriented, confused, and depressed," says Hall, whose work has included consoling Katrina survivors, counseling victims of domestic violence, and advising families in hospitals coping with cancer and AIDS. Stress comes in countless incarnations, from poor, homeless single mothers to wealthy, depressed CEOs. "It's our nation's greatest democratizer," she says, "and it's not going anywhere."

In her case, that moment of panic by the elevator turned out to be a catalyst for self-inquiry. She quit her job, retreated for six months to a remote cabin at her Clarksville, Georgia, home, and then spent the next seven years on an entirely different course, pursuing a master's in divinity at Emory University and then a doctorate in spirituality at Columbia University. She studied with an eclectic group of visionaries -- Thich Nhat Hanh and Bishop Desmond Tutu, Trappist monks and Sufi leaders -- and noticed that, despite their diverse backgrounds, they all seemed to advocate the same ground-up approach to life. "So many of us strive to move onward and upward, but I began to see that the path to joy starts with an entirely different approach: inward and downward. Seeds first move inward and downward to root -- and then toward the light, upward and forward." Reducing susceptibility to stress, she realized, was essentially a matter of nourishing the roots.

She adopted a powerful but surprisingly simple mantra -- SELF, an acronym for serenity, exercise, love, and food -- and started teaching it to others to great effect. These "four roots of real happiness" may seem almost too easy, but she insists they have a centering effect in even the worst of circumstances. "It's these basic, ordinary actions that ground you," she explains. "By attending to your roots each day, you learn to stay focused and intentional -- and stay true to your design." Making time for serenity, for instance, creates space in our lives for meditation and stress reduction; exercise benefits the spirit and mind as well as the body; love and friendship bring physiological and emotional rewards; and nourishing food, consciously consumed, feeds the senses in a deeply satisfying way. It's these simple things, she says -- a moment to connect with your breath, a walk in the park, a hug from a friend, a thoughtfully prepared meal -- that keep us balanced.
From Body+Soul, March 2007 | Send Me a Free Preview Issue Now!
Next Page: 10 Secrets to a Stress-Free Life


I love the acronym SELF and will put it to good use. Thank you!

Trust you find it useful.

James Oh
Post a Comment